Health and wellness fairs and programs

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Wellness Program – Objectives and Objectives.   

Goals are broad-based statements about what the program is expected to do. the goal of the wellness program is to enhance the health of the individual and the organization. Goals like mission statements provide direction in a program.   

Objectives are specific and provide a means of measurement of the program to determine effectiveness. There are two kinds of objectives, process and outcome.    

Process objectives state the activities that need to occur to achieve a desired outcome.

Examples of process objectives are –

• Number of participants screened

• Number of participants in and completing health betterment programs

• Satisfaction of program participants

• Number of participants who were medically referred and saw their physician

• Number of promotional activities

• Number of participants seen in follow-up

Example of outcome goals are –

• Number of participants who improved fitness level

• Number of participants who decreased cholesterol level

• Number of participants who lost weight, body fat

• Number of participants who quit use of tobacco

• Number of participants with high blood pressure (BP) who decreased their blood pressure (BP)

• Number of participants whose initial level of alcohol consumption put them at-risk who are no longer at-risk

• Number of participants with risk factors who saw their doctor and are being treated for high blood pressure (BP) or cholesterol years later

August 30, 2010   No Comments

Wellness Program Committee.

Wellness committees are important in that they develop a sense of ownership in the program, and facilitate various tasks involved in wellness programming at the workplace.

The committee should be composed of a cross-section of employees representing various occupations, levels, and subgroups with the organization.

A common mistake is filling the committee with the most health/fitness-conscious people  in the corporation. Do not rely solely on volunteers to fill a committee. Be sure that your committee members have enough power in the corporation to run an effective wellness program.

The wellness committee is made up of staff members from the workplace. It oversees the wellness program and assists carry it out.

The committee ought to meet about once a month to review the previous month’s activities and plan future ones. When the program is just starting, the committee may meet weekly until things get going.

Committee members don’t carry out medical procedures, counsel customers, or handle confidential medical information. Wellness experts perform these tasks.

In general, the committee’s duties fall into three areas –  planning, promoting, and helping to run programs.

Planning the programs can include –

• Locating space for activities

• Planning and organizing worksite-wide events such as contests

• Evaluating reports prepared by the program staff and making recommendations

Promoting the program can include –

• Recruiting workers to participate in screening and health improvement programs

• Encouraging employees to participate in follow-up counseling

• Organizing promotional strategies using newsletters, signs, bulletin boards, computers, and other media available within the workplace

Helping to run the program can include –

• Establishing up equipment for various activities

• Assisting to conduct worksite-wide activities

• Monitoring all activities and evaluating  the performance of the professional staff

• Acting as wellness mentors to fellow employees

The size of the wellness committee will be dependent on the size of the organization. Pick members by asking day management to nominate or appoint workers.

Make an announcement through flyers, memos, and meetings to recruit potential members. Explain the purpose of the committee, duties and responsibilities, and the time commitment.

Recognize your wellness committee volunteers. Allow them to participate in programs at a decreased cost. Hold appreciation breakfasts/lunches/dinners.

Print names of committee members on business communications about the wellness program.

Purchase special T-shirts, caps, and buttons for them. Write letters to supervisors saying that you appreciate the member’s service. Develop awards certificates for members.

The following can be used as a guide for committee size –    

• Less than 300 employees   2 to 4

• 300 to 1,000 employees   4 to 6

• 1,000 staff members or more   6 to 12

August 29, 2010   No Comments

Wellness Programs and Corporate Culture.

Effective wellness programs recognize the importance of building a supportive cultural environment. the workplace culture includes shared values/heartfelt beliefs about what is important. It includes social standards of expected and accepted behavior called “cultural norms.”

It includes coworker support from family, friends, and coworkers. This support can help one adopt healthful lifestyles. Tools are available to audit a company.

The long-term success of any wellness program is dependent on the corporate culture.

Some healthful culture signs in a company are –

• Staff Members communicate openly

• Leaders support diversity and opinion

• Workers have fun

• Policies support wellness

• Workers are encouraged to grow

• Employees work together as a team

• Employees’ skills and talents are matched to their jobs.

• Flexible work schedules are available

• Corporations consider workers as their most asset

August 28, 2010   No Comments

Wellness Program – Be sure to work Environment.

Effective wellness programs try to develop healthy workplace climates. A healthy workplace climate is one which encourages teamwork, cooperation, and empowerment of the individual.

People  have a sense of community, a shared vision, and a positive outlook. Policies promote and support wellness efforts within the workplace.

• Effective programs identify ways that business policies and organizational traditions encourage wellness.

• Effective programs work at the group and organizational level to build support for healthful lifestyle choices.

• Effective programs set clear target goals and goals for the health improvement of the worksite.

August 27, 2010   No Comments

Wellness Program – Needs Assessment.

An initial biometric testing can include a recent survey of employees’ interests as part of the assessment. Successful wellness programs are designed to meet the needs and interests of the employees.

The information you need to get from a recent survey depends on the scope of your program. A sample survey can be obtained in the HOPE Publications Web site.

If you plan to adapt this sample survey or create your own survey, keep the following hints in mind –

• Ask mainly closed-choice questions, especially when you’ll be sending the survey to a big number of staff members. Closed-choice questions provide specific choices and are easy to tabulate. You might want to use a computer for data entry and analysis.

• Invite comments, suggestions and recommendations, or ask open-ended questions after the survey. Open-ended items are more challenging to summarize.

• Include a brief explanatory cover letter with the survey with the signature of the business president. Be sure to include a statement about confidentiality and anonymity.

• Ask a group of representative employees to review the survey before it’s distributed. Find out when the questions will be understood by employees and will not be objected to.

• Include demographic information at the starting or end of the survey. Consider various ways that you might analyze the responses by demographic characteristics (gender, age, shift, site, department, etc.).

When considering who ought to get the survey, a simple rule is when you’ve under 500 employees, everyone ought to receive one. the public relations advantage of everyone receiving a recent survey can be significant.

Over 500 employees, a sample of the work population will suffice. A sample saves on costs and time. You might want to consider consulting with a statistician to determine an appropriate sample size for your worksite.

Needs surveys are confidential and anonymous; they do not request information that may identify a individuals.

Getting support from management is critical to the success of the program.

One way to do this is to survey managers (see forms) and conduct interviews with decision-makers in the organization. You can use the surveys here or make up your own.

If you decide to do your own, keep the survey short. It shouldn’t take more than ten minutes to complete.

The interview process can also serve to educating management. Give concise fact sheets on the benefits of wellness programs for management.

When surveys and interviews are completed, tally the surveys and write brief summaries of the interviews. Give these reports to management.

Once completed present a brief executive summary to management. Highlight several intriguing findings that could be used immediately to make decisions about the program.

Utilize charts and graphs to make your points. Prepare a detailed report for wellness committee members itemizing each response. Give a short article about the survey in the business newsletter.

The higher the response the more valid and reliable the results. A minimum response of 40 percent to 50 percent is acceptable.

August 26, 2010   No Comments

What is A Extensive Wellness Program?   

Comprehensive wellness programs involve all employees, deal with all major health risks, offers options, and target both the employees and the worksite environment; provide periodic evaluation of its results.     

Extensive wellness programs emphasize follow-up and offers support for the worker if he/she is employed. Studies have shown this approach to be highly successful. Key components are planning, implementation, and analysis.   

Planning extensive wellness programs involve performing a needs and interest assessment, appointing a wellness committee, selecting  wellness providers, setting goals/objectives for the wellness program, advertising/promoting the program, and establishing procedures to ensure confidentiality.   

Implementation of extensive wellness programs consist of five major tasks –    

1   Medical screening and referral

2   Follow-up and counseling staff members

3   Follow-up with physicians

4   Health betterment programs

5   Organizing worksite-wide activities.

Investigation involves monitoring wellness programs to find out when it is working and to help you refine it. Measuring success shows what you have achieved, helps justify costs, and provides information for management to support continued programming.   

Comprehensive wellness programs involve all staff members, deal with all major health risks, offers choices, and target both the staff members and the worksite environment; provide periodic evaluation of its results.     

Extensive wellness programs emphasize follow-up and offers support for the employee as long as he/she is employed. Studies have shown this approach to be highly successful. Key components are planning, implementation, and analysis

Planning extensive wellness programs involve performing a needs and interest assessment, appointing a wellness committee, picking  wellness providers, setting goals/objectives for the wellness program, advertising and marketing/promoting the program, and establishing procedures to ensure confidentiality

Implementation of robust wellness programs consist of five major tasks –

• Health testing and health risk (assessment|appraisal}

• Follow-up and counseling employees

• Follow-up with doctors

• Health betterment and disease avoidance programs

• Organizing worksite-wide wellness program activities.

Evaluation involves monitoring wellness programs to find out if it is working and to help you refine it.

Measuring success shows what you’ve achieved, assists justify costs, and provides information for management to support continued programming.

August 25, 2010   No Comments

Wellness Programs Economic Considerations.   

Initially introduced by Halbert Dunn in the 1950′s, wellness became a popular buzzword during the late 1970′s and received considerable academic attention in the 1980′s.     

Wellness programs for staff members became more widespread during the following decade, and credible evidence for their economic viability started to be published.     

There have now been over 100 published studies on this topic and a number of systematic reviews.

Health risks increase costs.  Medical and health insurance costs escalate with both age and number of risks present.8,10   the number of risks is also strongly related to sick leave absenteeism, Employee’s Compensation costs, short-term disability, and lowered productivity (“presenteeism”).

Early employee wellness programs were relatively basic and normally produced a return on investment (ROI) of less than one dollar for every dollar spent operating the program (ROI = <1 - 1).8

Such programs might  be characterized as “fun-oriented”.  Participation is entirely voluntary, and there is no particular focus on the reduction of particularly identified high risks.  

Interventions and activities aren’t customized, and there is no emphasis on the management of healthcare costs.  These programs are usually site-based only, lack choices to address all the major behaviorally-related health risks, and lack multimodal presentation.  

Minimal or no incentives are provided to workers for participation, and services to spouses and family members are not available.  Most such programs lack meaningful analysis.  

More conventional programs are “activity-oriented” and have shown an ROI of between 1 – 2.5 and 1 – 3.5.8 These programs might have a greater emphasis on health and risk reduction, although the efforts are relatively broad and not personalized.  

They could have some generalized emphasis on health cost management, although not necessarily aimed at specific high risks.  Most are site-based and voluntary, with spouses included only rarely.  

Modest incentives may  be utilized to encourage participation.  Formal investigation may  be weak.

The newest and most economically viable programs are “results-oriented” and exemplify the health and productivity management model.  These programs consistently produce return rates of 1 – 4 or greater within a 12-24 month period.8  

Such programs are strongly focused on the reduction of specifically identified high risks and the management of health costs.  They are usually voluntary, but use strong financial and other incentives to promote participation.  

They’re multi-component in nature (address all major risks), and have both onsite and virtual modalities of operation.  The interventions are highly targeted and individualized, and offered to spouses in addition to staff members.

For corporations, the cost of providing medical insurance for their staff members is of great importance.  Those costs have been increasing at annual rates between 6 percent and 14 percent.

Chapman’s 2007 systematic review7 reported an average reduction in healthcare costs of 26.5% thus of worker wellness programs.  His review covered 60 of the most scientifically precise studies, with an average of 3.77 years of study.

Absenteeism due to disease is another cost driver.  Chapman’s review7 reports an average reduction in sick time of 25.3%.   Cost for Employee’s Compensation was decreased by 40.7%, and disability costs by 24.2%.

There’s also an emerging literature on the costs of presenteeism (reduced productivity).11,13  In one study, every risk decreased through a wellness program yielded a 9 percent reduction in presenteeism (and a 2 percent reduction in absenteeism).11

Some companies have achieved a zero% increase in healthcare costs across at least brief periods of time.10  Doing so requires 90-95% participation of the worker population in focused wellness programs, with 75%-85% of the workers falling into the low risk category.10     

Although robust efforts to lower the risk status of those in moderate or high risk categories ought to be made, the needs of currently healthful employees ought to be addressed as well to avoid increases in risk-status.   

Given the size of the federal workforce, meaningful cost savings in the government’s contribution to medical insurance premiums for workers may be achieved when a majority of that population were participating in active wellness programs.     

Likewise, improvements in absenteeism, employee’s compensation, disability, presenteeism, and turnover then of comprehensive worker wellness programs would yield substantial fiscal benefits for the government.   

References   

1   Aldana, Steven G.  (2001)   Financial Impact of Wellness Programs –   A Robust Review of the Literature.   Am J Wellness 15(5) – 296-320.

2   Chapman, Larry.  (1998)   the Role of Incentives in Wellness.  The Art of Wellness  2(3) – 1-8.

3   Chapman, Larry.   (2003)   Biometric Screening in Wellness –   is it Really as Important as We Think?  the Art of Wellness  7(2) – 1-12.

4   Chapman, Larry.  (2005)   Meta-Analysis of Corporate Wellness Economic Return Studies –  2005 Update.  The Art of Wellness, July/August, 1-15.

5   Chapman, Larry.   (2006)   Staff Member Participation in Corporate Wellness and Wellness Programs –   How Important are Incentives, and Which Ones work Best?   North Carolina Medical Journal   67(6) –   431-432.

6   Chapman, Larry, Lesch, Nancy, and Passas Baun, Mary Beth.   (2007)   the Role of Wellness Coaching in Corporate Wellness.   the Art of Wellness, July/August, 1-12.

7   Chapman, Larry.  (2007)   Proof Positive –   an Analysis of the cost-Effectiveness of Corporate Wellness.  Northwest Health Management Publishing, Seattle, WA.

8   Chapman, Larry.  (2007)   an In-Depth Look at the Economic Evidence for Rewarding Health Behavior Change.   Workshop presentation at the World Research Group “Rewarding Healthy Behaviors for Health Plans and Corporations” Conference, Orlando, FL, January 23-24.

9   Edington, Dee.   (2001)   Emerging Research –   A View from One Research Center.  American Journal of Wellness 15(5) –  341-349.

10   Edington, Dee W.  (2007)   Health Management as a Serious Company Strategy.  Presentation at the World Research Group “Rewarding Healthful Behaviors for Health Plans and Employers” Conference, Orlando, FL, January 23-24.

11   Pelletier, Barbara, Boles, Myde, and Lunch, Wendy.  (2004)  Changes in Health Risks and Make sure to work Productivity.   Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 46(7) –  746-754.

12   Pelletier, Kenneth R.  (2005)   A Review and Analysis of the Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness Studies of comprehensive Health and Illness ManagementPrograms at the Worksite –  Update VI 2000-2004.  JOEM 47(10)1051-1058.

13   DeVol, Ross, Bedroussian, Armen, et. al.  (2007)  an Unhealthy America –   the Economic Burden of Chronic Condition.  Report released by the Milken Institute.   www.milkeninstitute.org.

14   Partnership for Prevention.  (2008) Investing in Health –   Proven Wellness Practices for Workplaces.   http – //www.prevent.org/images/stories/2008/investinginhealth_finalfinal.pdf.

August 24, 2010   No Comments

Effective Wellness Programs.

Corporate America is increasingly investing in employee wellness because it’s good company.  In order to meet productivity demands, corporations must rely on a healthful, productive workforce to succeed in the highly competitive global marketplace.  

Over a hundred studies in both corporate and governmental establishings have documented the economic advantages of worker wellness programs, including decreased absenteeism, decreased injuries and workman’s compensation costs, decreased healthcare costs, decreased worker turnover, as well as increased productivity, greater worker satisfaction, and improved morale.1-10  

The more recent literature reflects improvements in wellness programming along with greater return on investment.  In general, the more focused and intensive the program, the greater benefit realized.  

To enhance their effectiveness federal government worker wellness programs could  be able to incorporate some features described.  Employee wellness programs shown to have positive returns on investment often include the following features –    

1   Health and productivity management model

Programs characterized by this model focus attention on identification and reduction of specific risks or behaviors like tobacco use, lack of physical activity, excess weight, unhealthy diet, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, stress, depression, and so on.     

High-risk workers are particularly targeted for intervention, although the most successful programs also direct efforts towards healthy workers in order to maintain their low-risk status.  This model emphasizes outcomes as opposed to simply offering wellness activities for their own sake.     

2   Health risk (assessment|appraisal}

Use of a computerized health risk (assessment|appraisal}  instrument with individualized feedback and recommendations is nearly universal in successful programs.  Workers take the questionnaire yearly in many cases.     

The HRA serves to elevate awareness, provide direction, and motivate individuals to improve specific behaviors.  In some cases, the personalized report is directly linked to appropriate resources related to identified risks.     

Research indicates that the use of an HRA is effective when it is followed by some kind of educational or therapeutic intervention for identified risks.  It often serves as the entry point into wellness programs.   

3   Biometric analysis

A lot of wellness programs combine the results of the health risk (assessment|appraisal} with measurement of each employee’s biometrics, including weight and Body Mass Index , blood pressure, cholesterol, fasting glucose, and assorted other metrics.     

Combining the results of the HRA with biological measures results in a more valid risk profile.   Computerized health risk (assessment|appraisal}s often incorporate biometric data in their risk analysis.   

4   Wellness Program Incentives

Staff Members are frequently given monetary or other significant rewards for completing an HRA, participation in a program or class, specific accomplishments like stopping use of tobacco, losing weight, or exercising, and for maintaining healthful status and/or behaviors.     

In many cases the monetary incentives are associated with reductions in medical insurance premiums.  Some programs use disincentives in addition to incentives, like charging employees who smoke higher rates for their medical insurance contribution.   

5   High wellness program participation rates

Successful programs use incentives to drive participation rates up.  They also market their programs comprehensively, and may use contest or challenge strategies to heighten enthusiasm and encourage participation.   

6   Wellness coaching

Employees with identified risks or desire to improve their health habits may  be periodically coached via telephone by trained health coaches.     

Coaching helps staff members set and achieve realistic lifestyle-related goals including those addressing stress, work life balance, tobacco use, weight, exercise, and various behavior modifications.     

Three or more sessions are generally offered.  In some intensive programs, the coaching extends to actual disease management intervention for workers with identified high-risk illnesses.    

7   Multiple formats

Programs may offer wellness content in online, paper, and seminar formats to provide stimulating variety and alternatives for accommodate the needs of all employees.     

In addition to onsite physical activity and healthy eating events, on-line programs, e-mail reminders and notices, printed newsletters and materials, and workplace classes and workshops are common dissemination strategies.   

8   Upper-level management support

Enthusiastic and frequent endorsement by  senior level management is crucial to achieving high rates of participation.  When senior executives are wellness role models themselves the effects of endorsement are enhanced.   

9   Frequent contact

Successful programs have frequent contact of some sort with every employee.  This could  be through advertising and marketing efforts (e.g., posters, e-mail notices, reminders, or messages, etc.), bulletin boards, newsletters, staff meeting presentations, discussion in new employee orientation, supervisory sessions, etc.      

The key is to enhance employee awareness of wellness opportunities and reinforce the corporate emphasis on wellness through frequent and multiple “touches”.   

10   Open enrollment

To encourage high participation rates workers must have easy access to the wellness programs and activities.  Open and uncomplicated enrollment processes achieve this.     

Some businesses automatically enroll all staff members and then allow those who do not wish to participate to “opt-out”.  This practice has been proven to improve enrollment rates in some establishings.   

11   Family involvement

A lot of programs encourage spouses and other family members to participate in the corporation wellness activities and to adopt a healthy lifestyle along with the designated worker.  It’s far easier for the worker to have a healthy lifestyle if his/her family does so as well.   

12   Use of tobacco cessation

Because tobacco use and other tobacco use is the number one threat to health it’s critical to offer employees effective and convenient assistance with quitting.     

Access to smoking cessation pharmaceuticals is often part of such programs.  In-house programs provide the most convenient access to these services, although on-line or telephone-based programs could  be available as well.     

13   Physical Activity

Regular exercise is a core component of every wellness program.  Employees ought to be strongly encouraged to engage in regular exercise.     

Most programs provide either periodic or continuous on-site opportunities, and some locations have on-site health clubs, swimming pools, walking trails, etc.  Discounted or compensated memberships to community exercise facilities is a common alternative to on-site facilities.   

14   Weight management

Because obesity is a major threat to health it’s imperative that programs offer effective assistance with weight control.  Extensive encouragement from  senior level management to shed excess weight is important.     

Internet Based programs, worksite programs, or discounted access to weight control programs in the community may all be available.  Long-term follow-up is crucial for maintenance of weight loss.   

15   Stress management

Workplace stress is perhaps the most common complaint among workers and a major contributor to absenteeism, presenteeism (reduced productivity), and low morale.     
   
Nearly all successful wellness programs offer assistance with personal and workplace stress.  Some programs refer staff members to outside resources for additional serious conditions like depression and anxiety disorders, but most offer web-based or frequent on-site general stress reduction programs.     
   
Some companies endeavor to structure the work environment to minimize stress, both physically and operationally.   

16   Medical screenings/immunizations

Employees are actively encouraged to complete recommended health screenings for blood pressure, cholesterol, Body Mass Index (BMI), colorectal and breast cancer, and others.     

Annual influenza immunizations are also encouraged.  Some sites provide these services at the worksite.  Incentives are often awarded for completion of these screenings/immunizations.    

17   On-Site health care

Actual provision of onsite primary care medical services is a growing trend.  The quickly escalating costs of medical care insurance for employees has stimulated this trend.     

Some corporations have found that it’s less expensive to provide primary care services themselves than to fund those services through health insurance.     

Onsite care also reduces the amount of time employees would otherwise spend away from the worksite getting such services.    

References   

1   Aldana, Steven G.  (2001)   Financial Impact of Wellness Programs –   A Comprehensive Review of the Literature.   Am J Wellness 15(5) – 296-320.

2   Chapman, Larry.  (1998)   the Role of Incentives in Wellness.  The Art of Wellness  2(3) – 1-8.

3   Chapman, Larry.   (2003)   Biometric Screening in Wellness –   is it Really as Important as We Think?  the Art of Wellness  7(2) – 1-12.

4   Chapman, Larry.  (2005)   Meta-Investigation of Corporate Wellness Economic Return Studies –  2005 Update.  The Art of Wellness, July/August, 1-15.

5   Chapman, Larry.   (2006)   Staff Member Participation in Corporate Wellness and Wellness Programs –   How Important are Incentives, and Which Ones work Best?   North Carolina Medical Journal   67(6) –   431-432.

6   Chapman, Larry, Lesch, Nancy, and Passas Baun, Mary Beth.   (2007)   the Role of Wellness Coaching in Corporate Wellness.   the Art of Wellness, July/August, 1-12.

7   Chapman, Larry.  (2007)   Proof Positive –   an Analysis of the cost-Effectiveness of Corporate Wellness.  Northwest Health Management Publishing, Seattle, WA.

8   Chapman, Larry.  (2007)   an In-Depth Look at the Economic Evidence for Rewarding Health Behavior Change.   Workshop presentation at the World Research Group “Rewarding Healthful Behaviors for Health Plans and Corporations” Conference, Orlando, FL, January 23-24.

9   Edington, Dee.   (2001)   Emerging Research –   A View from One Research Center.  American Journal of Wellness 15(5) –  341-349.

10   Edington, Dee W.  (2007)   Health Management as a Serious Corporation Strategy.  Presentation at the World Research Group “Rewarding Healthy Behaviors for Health Plans and Businesss” Conference, Orlando, FL, January 23-24.

11   Pelletier, Barbara, Boles, Myde, and Lunch, Wendy.  (2004)  Changes in Health Risks and Make certain to work Productivity.   Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 46(7) –  746-754.

12   Pelletier, Kenneth R.  (2005)   A Review and Analysis of the Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness Studies of robust Health and Disease Management (DM)Programs at the Worksite –  Update VI 2000-2004.  JOEM 47(10)1051-1058.

13   DeVol, Ross, Bedroussian, Armen, et. al.  (2007)  an Unhealthy America –   the Economic Burden of Chronic Illness.  Report released by the Milken Institute.   www.milkeninstitute.org.

14   Partnership for Prevention.  (2008) Investing in Health –   Proven Wellness Practices for Workplaces.   http – //www.prevent.org/images/stories/2008/investinginhealth_finalfinal.pdf.

August 23, 2010   No Comments

Wellness Program Analysis.

Examinations determine the outcome of a Wellness Program. They help you figure out if your objectives were met. It is a good idea to add an investigation component to your Wellness Program.

Evaluations may conclude that some interventions didn’t work well. You could find that a well-liked Wellness Program costs too much and didn’t really affect employees’ health.

While these may not be the outcomes you hoped for, without this information you could continue ineffective interventions. Having this information will help you develop better solutions.

When your results are good, it’s magnificent! You can spread the word to employees and management that your program is achieving its objectives.

Three major areas of an investigation

• Wellness Program structure – the basic framework of the program

• Wellness Program process – How well the program is run

• Wellness Program outcomes – Whether the program met the set objectives

Common questions used to evaluate a Wellness Program

Structure Questions

• What’s included in the Wellness Program? What’s the intervention?

• Where does the Wellness Program take place?

• How’s the Wellness Program delivered? What content is included?

• Who manages the Wellness Program?

Process Questions

• How many individuals  participate?

• Do participants complete the Wellness Program?

• Are participants satisfied?

• Which aspects of the Wellness Program are best attended?

Outcome Questions

• Does the Wellness Program improve knowledge about health issues?

• Does the Wellness Program change behavior?

• Does the Wellness Program save the corporation money?

• What’s the return on investment (ROI)?

Download a sample program (http – //www.ibx.com/pdfs/custom/wellness_partners/services/turnkey_programs/walking/participant_eval.pdf) analysis from IBC’s Walking Towards Wellness program.

• Identify through an staff member survey what incentives they value.

• Identify what incentives the organization can provide in addition to what the budget will allow.

• Ensure that every participant who achieves a goal receives some recognition.

• Avoid offering incentives for the “best” or the “most.”

• Prevent using food as a reward.

• Use incentives to promote your wellness program, through logos and branding.

August 22, 2010   No Comments

Wellness Program Incentives.

Incentives encourage employees to adopt positive behaviors or maintain an existing positive behavior that may potentially help the employee stay healthy and live longer. Adopting positive health behavior is fundamentally what wellness is about.

Incentives could be used to elevate participation rates, help individuals complete a Wellness Program, or help individuals change or adhere to healthful behaviors.

Providing incentives and rewards will send an important message to the workers that your organization is committed to helping them with bettering their health. It also plays a significant role in motivating individuals to participate.

Tips on how to choose appropriate incentives –

• Identify through an employee survey what incentives they value.

• Identify what incentives the organization can provide in addition to what the budget will allow.

• Ensure that every participant who achieves a goal receives some recognition.

• Prevent offering incentives for the “best” or the “most.”

• Prevent using food as a reward.

• Use incentives to promote your Wellness Program, through logos and branding.

August 21, 2010   No Comments